No New Bones Again This Week

Chris Palmer

    Just a note to let readers know, that once again my painting time was taken up with getting Ozz figures ready for Cold Wars.  That’s pretty much going to be the drill until after the con, so I will not by posting again until March 23, when I will be back to regular posting with new Bones.  My apologies for the break in regular posts.
 For those who are interested in learning more about the Wars of Ozz rules and figure lines, you can check out the website:  WarsofOzz or Facebook Group: WarsofOzzFacebook

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Wars of Ozz Figures Work in Progress

Buck

I have been painting at a feverish pace to get all the pre-production figures ready for FOUR demonstration games at Cold Wars in two weeks. Below you can see the work in progress pictures of many of the units. I don’t think any of these units have been previewed before, so enjoy this first look. (The figures are nicer than perhaps my paint job conveys, but these will give you an idea what will be coming soon.)

A view of the Munchkin light cavalry regiment. I have not decorated the bases or put on the flags yet in these pictures.
Another view of the Munchkin light cavalry.
A view from a different angle. All Munchkin cavalry is equipped with carbines.
A view of Munchkin heavy calvary. These are also armed with carbines.
Another view.
Munchkin heavy artillery. Note the bright colors of the artillery carriages. A result of the “madness bombs” that caused society to disintegrate is that the survivors have a penchant for bright colors.
Munchkin light artillery.
Gillikin heavy artillery.
Gillikin light artillery.

In addition to the four major nationalities (Munchkins, Quadlings, Gillikins, and Winkies), there are a number of other forces that can be used as “allies” or mercenaries when players create their armies. Below are pictures of one of those allies, the lesser pumpkin heads.

A view of lesser pumpkin heads.
Another view.
A third view.
A long shot of a lesser pumpkin head regiment.

I have three regiments of Quadlings to try to finish by Cold Wars. Here they are on the table ready for a coat of apothecary white.

Three Quadling regiments waiting to be painted.

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No Figure Today. :(

Chris Palmer

     Just wanted to let my readers know that I didn’t get a Bones figure completed for this week.  I was busy painting figures for demo games we’re going to be doing at the upcoming Cold Wars convention of a new rules set and figure line that Old Glory/Blue Moon is going to be releasing soon called “Wars of Ozz”.  Here’s some shots of the Wizard Zoraster, some of the Munchkin figures I’ve been working on, and one from a playtest we did Friday.

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Wars of Ozz Play Test at HAWKs Night

Buck

I was up in Maryland last weekend and had a chance to rejoin the HAWKs for club night. Along with Chris Palmer, Greg Priebe, Duncan Adams and Zeb Cook, we staged a rather large play test of Wars of Ozz. The rules are coming along. Each play test uncovers some minor issue that needs to be addressed or more clearly described in the draft rules, but the basic mechanics are working pretty well.

Zeb’s Winkies and Great Winged Apes attack Chris’ Munchkins and Great Pumpkin Heads while Greg holds the Munchkin center.
Duncan’s Quadling infantry and cavalry advance up the center to seize the Munchkin village. Duncan’s die rolling was habitually poor, so his forces advanced pretty slowly.
In the foreground you can see some Munchkins defending the field and town while Eric’s and Kevin’s Winkies (played with ersatz figures) advance.
A long shot of the table about 1/3 into the game.

We have Wars of Ozz official figures of Munchkins, some Winkies, and some of the other allies, but as we continue to play test the rules, we use ersatz figures as stand ins.

A close up shot of Zoraster’s guard defending a hedged field.
A view of two Winkie regiments early in the game.
All smiles before the carnage began.
The bad guys prepare to attack.

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Hungering Dead: Bones 4 Figures

Chris Palmer

   I’m still knee deep in painting stuff for next month’s Cold Wars convention, so once again I didn’t have a lot of time for painting Bones.  Therefore, I selected the simple  Hungering Dead group from the Bones 4 Core Set to work on.
     I prepped the figures in the usual way, soaking the parts in a dish of water with a couple drops of dish-soap added, then giving them a light scrub with a soft toothbrush, and then rinsing and drying them. I then assembled the figures with Gorilla Superglue gel.  Somewhere along the way, I lost one of the heads (it may have gone down the drain while cleaning), so I replaced it with a suitably ghoulish plastic head from the Frostgrave “Cultists” set.  After assembly, I glued them to 1" black-primed fender washers with Aleene’s Tacky glue.  I then glued the washers onto a tongue depressor with a couple drops of Elmer’s white glue.

    My plan for these guys was to try a real pale living-under-a-rock maggoty kind of color.   So, to begin with, I painted them a mix of Crafter’s Acrylic “Light Antique White” and Folk Art “Almond Parfait” (a pale take with hits of pink and yellow).

     When dry, I experimented with giving them a coat of Citadel Contrast “Apothecary White”.

     When dry, I drybrushed them with some Americana “Snow White”.  I wasn’t happy with that as they were looking too plain grey, and so when over them a little with Citadel Dry “Hellion Green” to add some color back in. I then filled their mouths with some Citadel “Reikland Fleshshade” wash, and when it was dry, picked out their teeth with the “Snow White”.  Next, I painted their eyes using Crafter’s Acrylic “Daffodil Yellow” for the “whites”.   

      Next, I painted their loin cloths using, left to right, Citadel Contrast “Wyldwood”, Citadel Contrast “Creed Camo”, and Citadel Contrast “Space Wolves Grey”.  I then did the hair on the righthand one with Citadel Contrast “Black Templar”.

     I then painted the skull the center one is holding using Citadel Contrast “Skeleton Horde”, and the stones and gravestone on the bases with Citadel Contrast “Basilicanum Grey”. Next, I went back and drybrushed the skull with some Americana “Bleached Sand”.  After that, I bumped up the highlighting on the first two loin cloths, using Folk Art “Teddy Bear Brown” on the left figure, and Americana “Jade Green"  on the center figure.   Lastly, I painted the bases with Americana "Mississippi Mud”.
     I let all the figures dry overnight and the next day I gave them a coat of Americana “DuraClear Matte” varnish.    Then, when  the varnish was dry, I used some white glue to flock the bases.  Another overnight dry, and I sprayed them with Testor’s “Dullcote”.  

   Well, I’m generally pleased with how the coloration turned out, and I think in general they look pretty good for fast paint jobs.

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Recent Painting for Upcoming Wars of Ozz

Chris Palmer      Some of my readers may remember that last October I posted some figures I had painted for an upcoming new 28mm range that Old Glory/Blue Moon were developing for release this year, called Wars of Ozz.  Buck Surdu is developing the rules to go with he figures, and I was invited in to be part of the playtesting team. 
     We have scheduled a bunch of demo games of the rules for the upcoming Cold Wars convention, (Friday night and all day Saturday), so these past couple months we’ve been busy painting up units for use in the game.   Here are some of the ones I’ve completed recently.

Zoraster, the Wizard
Colonel Sourdough’s Regiment of Munchkins

Colonel Tictoc’s Regiment of Munchkins

I also did up some sections of Yellow Brick road to use in the game (which I used in the above photos).   I used Christmas garden bricked streets which I subdivided into 2" widths, and then painted yellow with a small roller.

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Townsfolk Monk: Bones 4 Figure

Chris Palmer

     This past week I kicked my painting for next month’s Cold Wars convention into high gear.   So, I didn’t have a lot of time for painting Bones.  Therefore, I selected the Monk from the Bones 4 Core Set Townsfolk group to work on since it’s a simple figure.
     I prepped the figure in the usual way, soaking it in a dish of water with a couple drops of dish-soap added, then giving it a light scrub with a soft toothbrush, and then rinsing and drying it.  I then glued the figure to a black-primed 1" fender washer with Aleene’s Tacky glue, and then placed the figure in my painting grip.

     I began by painting his face and hands with Reaper MSP “Rosy Skin”.  I then painted his cassock with Americana “Light Cinnamon”, and his sleeves and collar with Americana “Fawn”.

     Next, I painted his cape with Americana “Neutral Grey”, and his shoes with Ceramcoat “Territorial Beige”. After that, I painted his hair with Americana “Asphaltum”, and the rope belt with Folk Art “Barn Wood”.

    I let the figure dry for a while, and then I gave his face and hands a coat of Citadel “Reikland Fleshshade” wash.   When that was dry, I gave his cassock, sleeves, collar, belt, and shoes all a coat of Citadel “Agrax Earthsahde” wash.  I let that dry, and then went over his cape with Citadel “Nuln Oil” wash.

     When all the washes were dry, I painted his eyes and then highlighted his face and hands with Rraper MSP “Rosy Highlight”.  After that, I highlighted his hair with first, Accent Mustard Seed", and then a little Folk Art “Butter Pecan”.  I then highlighted his cassock with the base “Light Cinnamon”, and then some of the “Light Cinnamon” mixed with a little of the “Fawn”.

     Next, I highlighted the collar and sleeves with the base “Fawn”, and then a little of the “Fawn” with some Americana “Bleached Sand” mixed in.  Then, I highlighted the cape with the base “Neutral Grey”, and a little of the “Neutral Grey” with some Americana “Grey Sky” mixed in.  After that, I highlighted his shoes with the Americana “Khaki Tan”.  Lastly, I painted the entire base with Americana “Mississippi Mud”.
      I let the figure dry overnight and the next day I gave it a coat of Americana “DuraClear Matte” varnish. I then used some white glue to glue some fine sand to the base.  When the sand was dry, I painted it with a coat of Americana “Raw Umber”. When this was dry, I drybrushed the sand with the “Territorial Beige”, and then with some of the “Butter Pecan”; lastly I drybrushed it with a little of the “Bleached Sand”.
      Another overnight dry, and I sprayed the figure with Testor’s Dullcote".

    I’m pretty happy with this one.   A simple figure, but a lot of character, and fun to paint.

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Spirit Beast: Bones 4 Dreadmere Figure

Chris Palmer

     This past week I painted a pair of the Spirit Beasts from the Bones 4 Dreadmere Expansion.  There was something about this figure that made me think of the Patronuses in the Harry Potter books and movies (And, yes, that is the proper plural; I looked it up!)  So, I decided to try for that glowing white/blue appearance that is the key feature of their appearance.
         I prepped the figures in the usual way, soaking the parts in a dish of water with a couple drops of dish-soap added, then giving them a light scrub with a soft toothbrush, and then rinsing and drying them. I then assembled the figures with Gorilla Superglue gel.   After that, I glued them to 1.25" black-primed fender washers with Aleene’s Tacky glue.  I then glued the washers onto a tongue depressor with a couple drops of Elmer’s white glue.

   I was going to try these with my new Citadel Contrast Paint, as I thought that would be ideal to give them their blue shadows.  So, I began by prepping them by painting them entirely with Americana “Snow White”.

     I then made a mix of some of the Citadel Contrast “Tallasar Blue”, and some of the blue-tinged Citadel Contrast “Space Wolves Grey”. I thinned this mix with a couple drops of water, and then applied it to the entire figures

     When the Contrast coat was dry, I drybrushed the figures with some of the “Snow White”, and then went back and painted further highlights directly with a brush using the “Snow White”.

Next, I painted the rocks they are standing on with Americana “Charcoal”; and when dry, gave them a light drybrushing with some Crafter’s Acrylic “Storm Cloud Grey”.  After that, I drybrushed them with some Crafter’s Acrylic “Cool Blue”, and then added a few “Snow White” highlights.  Lastly, I painted the bases with Americana “Mississippi Mud”.
     I let all the figures dry overnight and the next day I gave them a coat of Americana “DuraClear Matte” varnish.    Then, when  the varnish was dry, I used some white glue to flock the bases.  Another overnight dry, and I sprayed them with Testor’s “Dullcote”.  

    The shot below, using the camera’s flash, helps improve the “glowing” effect I think. 🙂

    Not too bad, but not quite as glowy as I would like.  Still I think it gets the idea of “Spirit Beast” across well enough.

   

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Napoleonic Day at JJCon 2020

Buck

Each year around the last weekend in January (usually Super Bowl weekend) a bunch of us get together to game our eyes out all weekend. Some are my high school gaming buddies, some are HAWKs. It is at my buddy JJ’s house outside Charlotte, NC, so we refer to the weekend as JJ Con. There were six of us this year as a few of the regulars were unable to attend.

I am in the middle of a move from Maryland to Florida. I had a car full of electronics and breakables, and Charlotte was a nice half way point. Of course a weekend of sleep deprivation made the second half of the drive from North Carolina to Florida less fun.

Friday we played a Combat Patrol™ France 1940 game with a scenario from one of the Skirmish Campaigns books. It was a lot of fun. Several of the attendees of JJ Con only game this one time a year, so we tend to stick with simple-to-learn rules and try to use the same rules each year to reduce the re-learning curve. Mark and Nick quickly recalled the Combat Patrol rules and were good-to-go after a turn or two. The French defenders won. That evening we played Roman Circus chariot racing and a “board game,” called Captain Sonar. Both were much fun.

Column, Line, Square

Saturday turned out to be Napoleonic Day. When we were in high school in Michigan, one of the adults we played with was Nick, who now lives in South Carolina and attends JJ Con each year. He played a lot of Column, Line, Square in the old days. Since moving to South Carolina his French, Russian, and Austrian armies have been packed away in boxes. I have been encouraging him for several years to break them out and put them on the table. This year he did! CLS has a great old-school feel. You do multiplication. The rules were written on a typewriter. And there were these wonderfully large battalions.

Russian cavalry forms up.

None of us had played CLS for at least 25 years, so we were all learning or re-learning for the first game. The table starts with a lot of figures and units and empties quickly, so after the first game we reset the table, changed the scenario, and played again. The second game went more smoothly, as we all had a good understanding of the basics — and were improving our math skills.

Setting up the game.
The French advance.
The game commences.

Duncan’s die rolling was up to par. In the second game, he failed just about every morale check (rolling 2, 3, or 4 on two dice), and at the end of the third turn, most of the units in the French center had routed to the table edge were were attempting to reform. This gave us time to deal with the other French infantry separately, but JJ’s French cavalry and Legere turned our flank and captured the key road intersection.

Another view of the advancing French. Don’t you just love those huge battalions?! This is what got me into wargaming in the first place!
The stalwart Russian defense.

There was the inevitable kvetching over the rules, which don’t necessarily appeal to modern tastes in rules, but I liked them at least as well as I remember enjoying them as a kid. Memory hadn’t romanticized them too much. One thing about CLS: stuff happens. I get frustrated when after ten turns of play, the table looks the same as it did ten hours before. In CLS, after about six turns, it was easy to see who won, because half the units had routed off the table. Musketry, cannon fire, and especially canister are devastating. The rules for melee are somewhat tedious, with lots of opposed die rolls needed, but again, the eventual outcome was clear and dramatic.

Early in the second game.

It was good to see these big battalions of Minifigs on the table again, and I think everyone enjoyed the games.

Combat Patrol™ Napoleonics

Our third game on Saturday was Duncan’s “Battle Before the Battle” scenario with Combat Patrol. In this game, both sides take the role of the skirmish screen as a French column advances to attack a British line. It was a close-run affair, with the British scoring more hits on the French battalion, but the British line receiving a withdraw and pin result from the French skirmish fire.

Early in the game.
The skirmishing commences. In this picture you can see the British line on the left represented by blocks of wood with pictures of figures applied. On the right you can see the head of the French column, also represented as blocks of wood. As the French column advances, two more blocks of wood are added to the column to show its advance.

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Hivewarden: Bones 4 Dreadmere Figure

Chris Palmer

     This past week I painted a pair of the Hivewardens from the Bones 4 Dreadmere Expansion.  I saw these just as usable as Pulp Sci-Fi baddies as Fantasy creatures.
          I prepped the figures in the usual way, soaking them in a dish of water with a couple drops of dish-soap added, then giving them a light scrub with a soft toothbrush, and then rinsing and drying them.  I then glued them to 1.25" brown-primed fender washers with Aleene’s Tacky glue.  I then glued the washers onto a tongue depressor with a couple drops of Elmer’s white glue.

     I began by painting the main tentacles with Folk Art “Poppy Seed”.  I then painted the brains with Crafter’s Acrylic “Tutti Frutti”, and the mouth tentacles with Americana “Charcoal”.

     Next, I painted the backsides of the brains with Pathfinder MSP “Urgathoa Red”, and then set the figures aside to dry for a while.  When I returned to working on them, I gave both the brains a coat of Citadel  “Reikland Fleshshade” wash.  When this wash was dry, I then gave all the tentacles a coat of Citadel “Nuln Oil” wash.

     When the final coat of wash was dry, I drybrushed the brains with some Reaper MSP “Brest Cancer Awareness Pink”, and then went back with a brush and applied some direct highlights to the brain ridges.  Then I added a little Americana “Snow White” to the pink and did a little lighter drybrush.  Next,  I drybrushed the tentacles with Americana “Jade Green”, and then a little Americana “Olive Green”, and lastly some Americana “Margarita”.  After that, I painted highlights on the mouth tentacles with some Americana “Grey Sky” mixed with some of the base “Charcoal”

       I then highlighted the backsides of the brains with Americana “Burgundy Wine”.  Next, I painted the eyes with Americana “Bleached Sand”.  I painted in irises with Accent “Forest Green”, and then filled them in with Folk Art “Metallic Emerald Green”, with some highlights using Folk Art Color Shift “Emerald Flash”. Next, I added Ceramcoat “Black” pupils, and highlight dots with the “Snow White”. Lastly, I painted the bases with Americana “Mississippi Mud”.
     I let all the figures dry overnight and the next day I gave them a coat of Americana “DuraClear Matte” varnish.    Then, when  the varnish was dry, I used some white glue to flock the bases.  Another overnight dry, and I sprayed them with Testor’s “Dullcote”.   When the “Dullcote” was dry, I went back and redid the eyes, with a little Americana “DuraClear Gloss” varnish.

     Overall, I’m pretty pleased with how they came out.  There are mold lines that run around the equator of the brains, that were just terrible.  Normally I don’t mess with mold lines to a big degree unless they are particularly obnoxious, but these really stood out; and being on the ridged surface of the brains they were almost impossible to deal with.  Also, the tentacles, being so intertwined as they are, were a real pain to paint and flock. Otherwise, these were fun figures to work on.

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